USED MOUNTAIN BIKE VALUES - BIKE VALUES


USED MOUNTAIN BIKE VALUES - 2007 TREK MOUNTAIN BIKES - DIRT BIKE POCKET BIKES.



Used Mountain Bike Values





used mountain bike values






    mountain bike
  • A bicycle with a light sturdy frame, broad deep-treaded tires, and multiple gears, originally designed for riding on mountainous terrain

  • a bicycle with a sturdy frame and fat tires; originally designed for riding in mountainous country

  • (Mountain biking) Mountain biking is a sport which consists of riding bicycles off-road, often over rough terrain, using specially adapted mountain bikes. Mountain bikes share similarities with other bikes, but incorporate features designed to enhance durability and performance in rough terrain.

  • (Mountain Biking) A designated, rugged, natural surfaced, single track trail that offers a range of riding opportunities.





    values
  • beliefs of a person or social group in which they have an emotional investment (either for or against something); "he has very conservatives values"

  • (value) fix or determine the value of; assign a value to; "value the jewelry and art work in the estate"

  • Estimate the monetary worth of (something)

  • (value) a numerical quantity measured or assigned or computed; "the value assigned was 16 milliseconds"

  • Consider (someone or something) to be important or beneficial; have a high opinion of











used mountain bike values - Values Clarification




Values Clarification


Values Clarification



Are you getting what you want out of life? Do you know where you draw the line when it comes to sex, money, cheating on your income tax ... or accepting an indecent proposal? Becoming aware of your values is the key to making wise choices in all aspects of your life, from picking a partner to buying a house. Created by Dr. Sidney Simon, coauthor of the bestselling Getting Unstuck, and two other leading professionals, this workbook has already had an impact on hundreds of thousands of lives. Its scores of intriguing, interactive exercises were designed to uncover the hidden beliefs that reveal what matters most to you, how you deal with life-changing conflicts, which career choices will make you happiest, what leisure time activities provide you with the most pleasure, where you honestly stand on controversial issues, what day-to-day events are likely to make you angry ... excited ... anxious ... confident, how best to motivate yourself, and what beliefs can cause conflict in your family or love relationship.










82% (18)





E&N Railline at Millstream/Atkins Section




E&N Railline at Millstream/Atkins Section





E&N Railtrail -- from Times-Colonist A1 Thursday, April 16, 2009.

"Trying figure out how to get the most for their stretched dollars, municipal politicians took a first-hand look at sections of the proposed E&N Rail Trail yesterday. They face a tough task. Not only is the $20.2-million project short $9 million in funding, work also has to be co-ordinated with major road projects planned in coming months in View Royal, Esquimalt and Victoria. That has Oak Bay Mayor Christopher Causton, who chairs the Capital Regional District parks committee, looking for consensus among municipalities over what sections can and should be developed first.

Particularly daunting is a one-kilometre stretch in Langford in the Millstream-Atkins area estimated to cost $4 million. That's because extensive retaining walls have to be built. To avoid that cost, it has been suggested the trail could temporarily tie into the Galloping Goose Trail and then onto bike lanes on
Wale Road and Goldstream Avenue."

GPS Coordinates on E&N: 48°26'55.62"N 123°28'20.69"W

I walked the Langford/Millstream/Atkins section of the E&N Railline, April 2, 2009. That day two heavy rail maintenance machines were working this section near the E&N, 7-Mile Marker. Please see photos. I asked one of the workers if this was the start of the proposed railtrail upgrade and he stated it was routine "track levelling".

Anyway, it occurred to me that if the project is short of funds and the exact methodology of building the railtrail are not quite finalized, may I suggest building the easier parts of the trail first then tackling these trouble-spots later. The proposed railtrail only has value if it has continuity for the pedestrian and
cycling traffic for which it will serve.

To this end, the Langford/Millstream/Atkins section could be initially built as single-track using nothing more technologically advanced then the machine seen in the photos which serves to "level track". One can see, if the trailside, single-track swath made by the machine were packed down sufficiently, it would be ideal for pedestrians and cyclists.

Those users not mature enough to share single-track with other users, could use the alternated route suggested: The Galloping Goose Trail or the roadway. Once past the single-track section, these users could rejoin the railtrail.

WJI

About WJI

He has walked and cycled the entire length of the Galloping Goose Trail from the Blue Bridge to Leechtown, Sooke, BC – and return -- on two separate occasions. WJI has photographed every section and trail marker of said trail since 2007. WJI has cycled the Lochside Trail from Spring Bridge to Sidney and return. He has cycled Colquitz Park to Glendale Trail and behind Elk Lake through to the Lochside and has cycled the entire length of the Interurban Trail. WJI has cycled the entire length of the Trans Canada Trail -- in both directions -- from Sooke Lake Road to Lake Cowichan including the Kinsol TrestleBypass. He is regular user of Hartland Surplus Mountain Bike Area. WJI walks 100km on average each month and cycles approximately the same distance. WJI desperately needs this new E&N Railtrail!












Ballast Regulator on E&N near 7-Mile Marker




Ballast Regulator on E&N near 7-Mile Marker





E&N Railtrail -- from Times-Colonist A1 Thursday, April 16, 2009.

"Trying figure out how to get the most for their stretched dollars, municipal politicians took a first-hand look at sections of the proposed E&N Rail Trail yesterday. They face a tough task. Not only is the $20.2-million project short $9 million in funding, work also has to be co-ordinated with major road projects planned in coming months in View Royal, Esquimalt and Victoria. That has Oak Bay Mayor Christopher Causton, who chairs the Capital Regional District parks committee, looking for consensus among municipalities over what sections can and should be developed first.

Particularly daunting is a one-kilometre stretch in Langford in the Millstream-Atkins area estimated to cost $4 million. That's because extensive retaining walls have to be built. To avoid that cost, it has been suggested the trail could temporarily tie into the Galloping Goose Trail and then onto bike lanes on
Wale Road and Goldstream Avenue."

GPS Coordinates on E&N: 48°26'55.62"N 123°28'20.69"W

I walked the Langford/Millstream/Atkins section of the E&N Railline, April 2, 2009. That day two heavy rail maintenance machines were working this section near the E&N, 7-Mile Marker. Please see photos. I asked one of the workers if this was the start of the proposed railtrail upgrade and he stated it was routine "track levelling".

Anyway, it occurred to me that if the project is short of funds and the exact methodology of building the railtrail are not quite finalized, may I suggest building the easier parts of the trail first then tackling these trouble-spots later. The proposed railtrail only has value if it has continuity for the pedestrian and
cycling traffic for which it will serve.

To this end, the Langford/Millstream/Atkins section could be initially built as single-track using nothing more technologically advanced then the machine seen in the photos which serves to "level track". One can see, if the trailside, single-track swath made by the machine were packed down sufficiently, it would be ideal for pedestrians and cyclists.

Those users not mature enough to share single-track with other users, could use the alternated route suggested: The Galloping Goose Trail or the roadway. Once past the single-track section, these users could rejoin the railtrail.

WJI

About WJI

He has walked and cycled the entire length of the Galloping Goose Trail from the Blue Bridge to Leechtown, Sooke, BC – and return -- on two separate occasions. WJI has photographed every section and trail marker of said trail since 2007. WJI has cycled the Lochside Trail from Spring Bridge to Sidney and return. He has cycled Colquitz Park to Glendale Trail and behind Elk Lake through to the Lochside and has cycled the entire length of the Interurban Trail. WJI has cycled the entire length of the Trans Canada Trail -- in both directions -- from Sooke Lake Road to Lake Cowichan including the Kinsol Trestle Bypass. He is regular user of Hartland Surplus Mountain Bike Area. WJI walks 100km on average each month and cycles approximately the same distance. WJI desperately needs this new E&N Railtrail!









used mountain bike values








used mountain bike values




Rediscovering Values






When we start with the wrong question, no matter how good an answer we get, it won’t give us the results we want. Rather than joining the throngs who are asking, When will this economic crisis be over? Jim Wallis says the right question to ask is How will this crisis change us?
The worst thing we can do now, Wallis tells us, is to go back to normal. Normal is what got us into this situation. We need a new normal, and this economic crisis is an invitation to discover what that means. Some of the principles Wallis unpacks for our new normal are . . .
• Spending money we don’t have for things we don’t need is a bad foundation for an economy or a family.
• It’s time to stop keeping up with the Joneses and start making sure the Joneses are okay.
• The values of commercials and billboards are not the things we want to teach our children.
• Care for the poor is not just a moral duty but is critical for the common good.
• A healthy society is a balanced society in which markets, the government, and our communities all play a role.
• The operating principle of God’s economy says that there is enough if we share it.
• And much, much more . . .
In the pages of this book, Wallis provides us with a moral compass for this new economy—one that will guide us on Wall Street, Main Street, and Your Street.
Embracing a New Economy
Getting back to "the way things were" is not an option. It is time we take our economic uncertainty and use it to find some moral clarity. Too often we have been ruled by the maxims that greed is good, it’s all about me, and I want it now. Those can be challenged only with some of our oldest and best values—enough is enough, we are in it together, and thinking not just for tomorrow but for future generations.
Jim Wallis shows that the solution to our problems will be found only as individuals, families, friends, churches, mosques, synagogues, and entire communities wrestle with the question of values together.

When we start with the wrong question, no matter how good an answer we get, it won’t give us the results we want. Rather than joining the throngs who are asking, When will this economic crisis be over? Jim Wallis says the right question to ask is How will this crisis change us?
The worst thing we can do now, Wallis tells us, is to go back to normal. Normal is what got us into this situation. We need a new normal, and this economic crisis is an invitation to discover what that means. Some of the principles Wallis unpacks for our new normal are . . .
• Spending money we don’t have for things we don’t need is a bad foundation for an economy or a family.
• It’s time to stop keeping up with the Joneses and start making sure the Joneses are okay.
• The values of commercials and billboards are not the things we want to teach our children.
• Care for the poor is not just a moral duty but is critical for the common good.
• A healthy society is a balanced society in which markets, the government, and our communities all play a role.
• The operating principle of God’s economy says that there is enough if we share it.
• And much, much more . . .
In the pages of this book, Wallis provides us with a moral compass for this new economy—one that will guide us on Wall Street, Main Street, and Your Street.
Embracing a New Economy
Getting back to "the way things were" is not an option. It is time we take our economic uncertainty and use it to find some moral clarity. Too often we have been ruled by the maxims that greed is good, it’s all about me, and I want it now. Those can be challenged only with some of our oldest and best values—enough is enough, we are in it together, and thinking not just for tomorrow but for future generations.
Jim Wallis shows that the solution to our problems will be found only as individuals, families, friends, churches, mosques, synagogues, and entire communities wrestle with the question of values together.










Similar posts:

80cc dirt bike engine

used gt mountain bike

trek 830 mountain bike

cannondale baggy fitness bike shorts

triathlon bike water bottle

bike helmet laws

bicycle storage shed



tag: used mountain bike values charity rides 2011 bicycle hitch rack

Comments:

Post a comment


非公開Comments:

Profile

Author:29er mountain biking
Welcome to FC2!

Latest journals
Latest comments
Latest trackbacks
Monthly archive
Category
Search form
Display RSS link.
Link
Friend request form

Want to be friends with this user.